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Toastmaster April 2011 : Page 4

LETTERS Do you have something to say? Write it in 200 words or less, sign it with your name, address and club affiliation and send it to letters@toastmasters.org. Lessons in Language and Laughter How happy I was to see the Toastmaster’s January issue filled with great articles for our English as a Second Language (ESL) club to read. Part of our mission is to include more American idioms, lan-guage mentors and humor in all our meetings. And there in the January issue, on page 8, is the wonderful article “Creating Your Bucket List,” by Craig Harrison, and the idiomatic expression “to kick the bucket.” Then on page 14 is “The Joy of Mentoring” (Bob Armstrong) – a bushel of rewards and dividends to delight potential and existing mentors and mentees. And, since our club feels that humor is important, the arti-cle “Humor Boosters” (Gene Perret) on page 16 is simply a great treat. I encourage each of our mem-bers, mentors and friends to read and re-read this January issue and to keep it as a “Meeting of the Minds” to treasure forever. Dr. Patricia Adelekan, DTM • English as a Second Language Club No. 1 Santa Ana, California encourage anyone else with speech disorders to include Toastmasters as a part of their strategy – along with professional help – to improve their fluency. Keith Swartz • President, Mead & Hunt Toastmasters Madison, Wisconsin able to overcome my fear. It’s really exciting to think differently and have innovative ideas and style. This article teaches us that if you are committed and focused, truly nothing is impossible in this world. Nikita Sequeira • Alghanim Toastmasters • Sufat, Shuwaikh, Kuwait. Stuttering Article Impacts Students I want to thank the Toastmaster maga-zine for the article “From Stuttering to Public Speaking” (January). I am a speech-language pathologist with an interest in fluency, and I teach master’s students in the School of Audiology and Speech Sciences at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. We have a very small onsite clinic for university students who stutter and wish to receive therapy, which is provided by our graduate students. One client recently joined Toastmasters and is having some success, which is also helping the client’s school presentations. Last week this client shared your article with us. I think the article is helping the client better understand the path to increasing confidence and improving public speaking skills. Lisa Avery, RSLP, Instructor • Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada February Issue Filled with Insights I just returned from a trip to Bolivia and have been enjoying the cultural flavor of the Toastmaster ’s February issue. Florence Ferreira’s article (“What Cultural Lenses Do You Wear?”) was right on target! It’s difficult to under-stand that other cultures see and inter-pret the world very differently from how we do. It’s a major challenge in our culturally diverse workplaces. Ferreira gave great examples and suggestions for seeing the world through another’s eyes. Beth Black’s article (“Found in Translation”) offers great guidelines for both speakers and interpreters. In my role as an interpreter, my responsibilities often include inter-preting impromptu conversations and meetings. Checking technical vocabulary and idioms are especially critical for a good translation. I often share responsibilities with English interpreters, and we help each other with any problem areas – including body language. Black’s comments on the pause are especially important. To give the audience a true interpretation, the speaker should allow time for inter-pretation of a single thought before continuing. This gives the audience (and the interpreter) time to digest the content. The February issue will become a permanent part of my research and resource files. Thanks for another fact-filled, value-packed issue! Linda Allen, ACB • Pacesetters Toastmasters • Stillwater, Oklahoma Stuttering Story Resonates I could relate to many of the experiences described in the article “From Stuttering to Public Speaking” (January) by Julie Bawden Davis. A fellow stutterer encouraged me to join Toastmasters and I am so glad he did. It has been one of the best experiences of my life. Nobody should be misled into believing that Toastmasters is a cure for stuttering. It improved my confi-dence and provided a forum for me to practice fluency-control strategies that I learned from professional speech pathologists and from The Stuttering Foundation – but Toastmasters is not a substitute for professional help. However, it was a big part of the process for me, and I A Big Accomplishment I loved the article “Dream Big, Act Big in 2011” (January) by Croix Sather. It was very inspiring and motivating. As Sather notes, Michelangelo once said, “The greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short, but in set-ting our aim too low and achieving our mark.” This is very true. I have joined the corporate club Alghanim Toastmasters, and so far my journey has been tremendously fun and beneficial. Stage fright always deprived me of speaking in front of large crowds, but now I’m 4 TOASTMASTER Apr il 2011

Letters To The Editor

Do you have something to say? Write it in 200 words or less, sign it with your name, address and club affiliation and send it to letters@toastmasters.org.<br /> <br /> Lessons in Language and Laughter <br /> <br /> How happy I was to see the Toastmaster’s January issue filled with great articles for our English as a Second Language (ESL) club to read. Part of our mission is to include more American idioms, language mentors and humor in all our meetings. And there in the January issue, on page 8, is the wonderful article “Creating Your Bucket List,” by Craig Harrison, and the idiomatic expression “to kick the bucket.” <br /> <br /> Then on page 14 is “The Joy of Mentoring” (Bob Armstrong) – a bushel of rewards and dividends to delight potential and existing mentors and mentees. And, since our club feels that humor is important, the article “Humor Boosters” (Gene Perret) on page 16 is simply a great treat.<br /> <br /> I encourage each of our members, mentors and friends to read and re-read this January issue and to keep it as a “Meeting of the Minds” to treasure forever.<br /> <br /> Dr. Patricia Adelekan, DTM • English as a Second Language Club No. 1 Santa Ana, California<br /> <br /> Stuttering Story Resonates <br /> <br /> I could relate to many of the experiences described in the article “From Stuttering to Public Speaking” (January) by Julie Bawden Davis.A fellow stutterer encouraged me to join Toastmasters and I am so glad he did. It has been one of the best experiences of my life.<br /> <br /> Nobody should be misled into believing that Toastmasters is a cure for stuttering. It improved my confidence and provided a forum for me to practice fluency-control strategies that I learned from professional speech pathologists and from The Stuttering Foundation – but Toastmasters is not a substitute for professional help. However, it was a big part of the process for me, and I Encourage anyone else with speech disorders to include Toastmasters as a part of their strategy – along with professional help – to improve their fluency.<br /> <br /> Keith Swartz •President, Mead & Hunt Toastmasters Madison, Wisconsin<br /> <br /> Stuttering Article Impacts Students <br /> <br /> I want to thank the Toastmaster magazine for the article “From Stuttering to Public Speaking” (January). I am a speech-language pathologist with an interest in fluency, and I teach master’s students in the School of Audiology and Speech Sciences at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. We have a very small onsite clinic for university students who stutter and wish to receive therapy, which is provided by our graduate students.<br /> <br /> One client recently joined Toastmasters and is having some success, which is also helping the client’s school presentations. Last week this client shared your article with us. I think the article is helping the client better understand the path to increasing confidence and improving public speaking skills.<br /> <br /> Lisa Avery, RSLP, Instructor • Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada<br /> <br /> A Big Accomplishment <br /> <br /> I loved the article “Dream Big, Act Big in 2011” (January) by Croix Sather. It was very inspiring and motivating.<br /> <br /> As Sather notes, Michelangelo once said, “The greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short, but in setting our aim too low and achieving our mark.” This is very true.<br /> <br /> I have joined the corporate club Alghanim Toastmasters, and so far my journey has been tremendously fun and beneficial. Stage fright always deprived me of speaking in front of large crowds, but now I’m Able to overcome my fear. It’s really exciting to think differently and have innovative ideas and style.<br /> <br /> This article teaches us that if you are committed and focused, truly nothing is impossible in this world.<br /> <br /> Nikita Sequeira • Alghanim Toastmasters • Sufat, Shuwaikh, Kuwait.<br /> <br /> February Issue Filled with Insights <br /> <br /> I just returned from a trip to Bolivia and have been enjoying the cultural flavor of the Toastmaster’s February issue. Florence Ferreira’s article (“What Cultural Lenses Do You Wear?”) was right on target! It’s difficult to understand that other cultures see and interpret the world very differently from how we do. It’s a major challenge in our culturally diverse workplaces.<br /> <br /> Ferreira gave great examples and suggestions for seeing the world through another’s eyes.<br /> <br /> Beth Black’s article (“Found in Translation”) offers great guidelines for both speakers and interpreters.In my role as an interpreter, my responsibilities often include interpreting impromptu conversations and meetings. Checking technical vocabulary and idioms are especially critical for a good translation. I often share responsibilities with English interpreters, and we help each other with any problem areas – including body language.<br /> <br /> Black’s comments on the pause are especially important. To give the audience a true interpretation, the speaker should allow time for interpretation of a single thought before continuing. This gives the audience (and the interpreter) time to digest the content.<br /> <br /> The February issue will become a permanent part of my research and resource files. Thanks for another fact-filled, value-packed issue!<br /> <br /> Linda Allen, ACB • Pacesetters Toastmasters • Stillwater, Oklahoma

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