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Toastmaster October 2011 : Page 2

TOASTMASTER VIEWPOINT PUBLISHER EDITOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS JUNIOR WRITER EDITORIAL ASSISTANT ART DIRECTION GRAPHIC DESIGN Daniel Rex Suzanne Frey Beth Black Paul Sterman Jennie Harris Michelle Tyler Susan Campbell Deidre Gaffney ® A GUEST IS SPECIAL I recently traveled from my home in California to Greenwich, Connecticut, to attend the wedding of a grade-school friend whom I had not seen in more than a decade. I didn’t know any of his cur-rent friends and at the wedding reception, when he was off getting his picture taken, I did not know a soul in the room. After 15 minutes of standing alone, I decided I had done my “friendship duty” and planned to return to my hotel room to watch TV. As I walked toward the exit, a woman approached me, smiled from ear to ear and said, “Michael Notaro! Is that you? Are you Michael Notaro?” She introduced herself and escorted me around the entire reception hall, introducing guests to the groom’s “special childhood friend, Michael Notaro.” People began crowding around to talk with me. Suddenly, I felt like a celebrity! I had the time of my life and was the last one to leave the recep-tion hall — well after midnight. TI OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS Founder Dr. Ralph C. Smedley (1878-1965) 2011-2012 OFFICERS International President Michael Notaro, DTM Alameda, California, USA International President-elect John Lau, DTM Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia First Vice President George Yen, DTM Taipei, Taiwan Second Vice President Mohammed Murad, DTM Dubai, United Arab Emirates Immediate Past President Pat Johnson, DTM Victoria, British Columbia, Canada Executive Director Daniel Rex Mission Viejo, California Secretary-Treasurer Sally Newell Cohen Mission Viejo, California 2011-2012 DIRECTORS James Sultan, DTM David Hollingshead, DTM Kirkland, Washington ASSIGNED TO REGION 1 Honolulu, Hawaii ASSIGNED TO REGION 2 Fort Worth, Texas ASSIGNED TO REGION 3 Calgary, Alberta, Canada ASSIGNED TO REGION 4 New Berlin, Wisconsin ASSIGNED TO REGION 5 Kanata, Ontario, Canada ASSIGNED TO REGION 6 Jacksonville, Florida ASSIGNED TO REGION 8 Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada ASSIGNED TO REGION 9 Los Angeles, California ASSIGNED TO REGION 10 Doha, Qatar ASSIGNED TO REGION 11 Airlie Beach, Queensland, Australia ASSIGNED TO REGION 12 Colombo, Sri Lanka ASSIGNED TO REGION 13 Meycauayan, Philippines ASSIGNED TO REGION 14 Kevin Doyle, DTM Wendy Harding, DTM David McCallister, DTM Roberta Perry, DTM Jacquie Schnider, DTM George Thomas, DTM Andrew Little, DTM Mike Storkey, DTM Gina Cook, DTM Balraj Arunasalam, DTM Viki Kinsman, DTM Christine Temblique, DTM “Do you remember what it felt like to be a guest at a Toastmasters meeting?” Do you remember what it felt like to be a guest at a Toastmasters meet-ing? You walk into a room filled with strangers, and there is the fear of meeting new people — combined with the fear of public speaking. Guests often feel alone and anxious. Some visitors make it as far as to the parking lot, but they are so frightened that they cannot get out of their car. Hospitality is critical to creating a warm and inviting environment at your Toastmasters club. Greeting guests is not just the responsibility of the sergeant at arms and vice president membership — every club member should make visitors feel welcome. Greet every guest as quickly as possible. Ask them to sign the club’s guestbook and engage them in a friendly conversation. Take the lead in introducing them to other members. Never let a guest sit alone. After the meeting, answer their questions and concerns, and follow up with a thank-you email. Of course, don’t forget to close the sale: Ask them to join. Treat guests like royalty and watch your membership grow at Toast-masters — a place where leaders are made. T Oakton, Virginia ASSIGNED TO REGION 7 TOASTMASTERS INTERNATIONAL P.O. Box 9052 t Mission Viejo, CA 92690 U.S.A. 949-858-8255 t Fax: 949-858-1207 Voicemail: 949-835-1300 www.members.toastmasters.org CONTACTING WORLD HEADQUARTERS For information on joining or building a club, visit: Article submission: Letters to the Editor: www.toastmasters.org submissions@toastmasters.org letters@toastmasters.org To change address, log in to: www.toastmasters.org/members The TOASTMASTER Magazine (ISSN 00408263) is published monthly by Toastmasters International, Inc., 23182 Arroyo Vista, Rancho Santa Margarita, CA 92688, U.S.A. Periodicals postage paid at Mission Viejo, CA and additional mailing office. POSTMASTER: Send address change to The TOASTMASTER Magazine, P.O. Box 9052, Mission Viejo, CA 92690, U.S.A. Published to promote the ideas and goals of Toastmasters Inter national, a nonprofit educational organization of clubs throughout the world dedicated to teaching skills in public speaking and leadership. Members’ subscriptions are included in the $27 semi-annual dues. The official publication of Toastmasters International carries authorized notices and articles regarding the activities and interests of the organization, but responsibility is not assumed for the opinions of the authors of other articles. The TOASTMASTER magazine does not endorse or guarantee the products it advertises. Copyright 2011 Toastmasters International, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Not responsible for unsolicited material. Toastmasters International, The TOASTMASTER and the Toastmaster International Emblem are trademarks of Toastmasters International registered in the United States, Canada and many other countries. Marca registrada en Mexico. Printed in U.S.A. MICHAEL NOTARO, DTM International President 2 WHERE LEADERS ARE MADE WHERE LEADERS ARE MADE www.toastmasters.org

A GUEST IS SPECIAL

MICHAEL NOTARO


I recently traveled from my home in California to Greenwich, Connecticut, to attend the wedding of a grade-school friend whom I had not seen in more than a decade. I didn’t know any of his current friends and at the wedding reception, when he was off getting his picture taken, I did not know a soul in the room.

After 15 minutes of standing alone, I decided I had done my “friendship duty” and planned to return to my hotel room to watch TV. As I walked toward the exit, a woman approached me, smiled from ear to ear and said, “Michael Notaro! Is that you? Are you Michael Notaro?” She introduced herself and escorted me around the entire reception hall, introducing guests to the groom’s “special childhood friend, Michael Notaro.”

People began crowding around to talk with me. Suddenly, I felt like a celebrity! I had the time of my life and was the last one to leave the reception hall — well after midnight.

Do you remember what it felt like to be a guest at a Toastmasters meeting? You walk into a room filled with strangers, and there is the fear of meeting new people — combined with the fear of public speaking. Guests often feel alone and anxious. Some visitors make it as far as to the parking lot, but they are so frightened that they cannot get out of their car.

Hospitality is critical to creating a warm and inviting environment at your Toastmasters club. Greeting guests is not just the responsibility of the sergeant at arms and vice president membership — every club member should make visitors feel welcome.

Greet every guest as quickly as possible. Ask them to sign the club’s guestbook and engage them in a friendly conversation. Take the lead in introducing them to other members. Never let a guest sit alone. After the meeting, answer their questions and concerns, and follow up with a thankyou email. Of course, don’t forget to close the sale: Ask them to join.

Treat guests like royalty and watch your membership grow at Toastmasters — a place where leaders are made.

Read the full article at http://magazines.toastmasters.org/article/A+GUEST+IS+SPECIAL/829803/81016/article.html.

Toastmasters International 90th Anniversary

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